Azure Red Hat OpenShift, a Kubernetes service jointly managed by Microsoft and Red Hat, is now available

Azure Red Hat OpenShift, a Kubernetes service jointly managed by Microsoft and Red Hat, is now available

3:22pm, 7th May, 2019
(Red Hat Photo) Companies interested in using Kubernetes to help manage their containerized applications have a new option from Microsoft and Red Hat that should ease them into the notoriously complex world of Kubernetes. Azure Red Hat OpenShift is now generally available, the two companies plans to announce Tuesday at the in Boston. Fresh off his keynote appearance on Monday, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is expected to join Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst on stage to show off the latest installment in the partnership between the two companies. EARLIER: is Red Hat’s container-management software product based around the open-source Docker and Kubernetes projects, and it’s designed for mainstream to late-adopter enterprise computing customers that want the benefits of containers without the hassle of managing them. It’s available both as a cloud service and for on-premises servers, but the launch of Azure Red Hat OpenShift represents a new direction for Red Hat, said Satish Balakrishnan, vice president of product management, in an interview with GeekWire. “We’re actually creating more choice but also creating a new model, where we’re offering this managed offering via Microsoft Azure. It’s the first of its kind in the world, in terms of a jointly engineered, supported and operated OpenShift platform,” Balakrishnan said. The two companies . OpenShift is available on other public clouds, but Microsoft and Red Hat will jointly manage and support this service on Azure and customers will be able to pay for it through a single unified bill from Azure under a revenue-sharing agreement. “A lot of the customers who we’re talking to that are interested in containers and Kubernetes are coming from a Red Hat background,” said Gabe Monroy, partner program manager at Microsoft. “They’re looking for OpenShift to help them in their journey to a more cloud-native world.” In general, a lot of those customers built applications around Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) a few years back and are looking for ways to modernize their infrastructure. They’re one of the biggest driving forces behind the embrace of hybrid cloud computing strategies by cloud computing providers, who have recognized that lots of companies have applications they can’t or won’t move to the cloud and need products that bridge the gap between their data centers and new applications built on cloud services. Red Hat engineers were given access to some of Microsoft Azure’s internal customer-support technology in order to make sure OpenShift would work as a jointly managed product, Monroy said. Red Hat and Microsoft also plan to jointly manage and support other Red Hat products on Azure, including RHEL, Ansible, and a combination of RHEL and SQL Server. , which should be the last one Red Hat puts on as an independent company while awaiting regulatory approval of . That approval is expected to come through in the second half of the year.
Google hopes Cloud Code encourages developers to deploy their apps to Kubernetes

Google hopes Cloud Code encourages developers to deploy their apps to Kubernetes

12:11pm, 10th April, 2019
(GeekWire Photo / Alan Boyle) Kubernetes is as much of a north star as anything for Google’s cloud computing efforts, and it thinks software developers need more help getting their applications deployed on the popular container-orchestration platform. Google unveiled , a set of plug-ins for popular integrated development environments (IDEs) Visual Studio Code and IntelliJ, Wednesday during the second day of . There are lots of services that help developers check their code for errors as they write — a developer-oriented version of that little red spellcheck line — but Cloud Code is designed specifically to catch problems with code that is intended for cloud-native environments. , and it was originally developed inside Google as a minimized version of the internal system Google uses to manage its own infrastructure. It is a complex beast and relatively new to a lot of software developers, forcing developers to learn new ways to write applications that will run reliably on cloud services. “Cloud code gives a power boost to your IDE,” said Pali Bhat, vice president of product management in Google, in a briefing at Google Cloud Next. IDEs were designed to work with local code, and Google thinks Cloud Code will allow developers to catch errors much earlier in the development cycle when they are easier to fix, he said. Visual Studio Code is the open-source version of Microsoft’s Visual Studio IDE, and it was the most popular development environment in . IntelliJ is also an open-source IDE used primarily by Java developers, and it ranked as the fourth-most popular IDE in the 2019 version of the survey released earlier this week.
Google Cloud introduces Anthos, a hybrid cloud management product based on Kubernetes

Google Cloud introduces Anthos, a hybrid cloud management product based on Kubernetes

11:59am, 9th April, 2019
Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian speaks at Google Cloud Next 2019. (GeekWire Photo / Tom Krazit) Invoking the mythical tech promise of “write once, run anywhere,” Google Cloud announced a new product Tuesday that customers running its managed container services can use to manage multiple cloud or hybrid cloud deployments. is based on Kubernetes, the open-source container-orchestration project originally developed at Google to manage complicated cloud deployments. Introduced right at the beginning of , it’s part of the and works with Google’s GKE managed Kubernetes service. The idea behind Anthos is to give potential customers who are loathe to modify older applications to run on cloud servers a way to move those applications to Google’s cloud without having to modify their code. When coupled with GKE On-Prem on self-managed servers, Anthos will let customers run on their own servers, on Google’s servers, and even on cloud services provided by rivals Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure. “With Anthos, you can run anywhere,” said Google’s Jennifer Lin, demonstrating for the 30,000 Cloud Next attendees how the product can manage workloads running on AWS. This has been a long-running promise made by generations of tech companies that never quite seems to actually work in practice, but Kubernetes is perhaps the closest we’ve yet gotten to achieving that goal. AWS and Microsoft have also prioritized hybrid cloud customers over the last few years. AWS has released several products developed in conjunction with data center stalwart VMware, and Microsoft’s Azure Stack product also offers similar technology.