E3’s organizer apologizes after revealing information for thousands of journalists

E3’s organizer apologizes after revealing information for thousands of journalists

11:06am, 3rd August, 2019
The Entertainment Software Association issued an apology of sorts after making available the contact information for more than 2,000 journalists and analysts who attended this year’s E3. “ESA was made aware of a website vulnerability that led to the contact list of registered journalists attending E3 being made public,” the organization said via statement. “Once notified, we immediately took steps to protect that data and shut down the site, which is no longer available. We regret this this occurrence and have put measures in place to ensure it will not occur again.” It’s not clear whether the organization attempted to reach out to those impacted by the breach. In a kind of bungle that utterly boggles the mind in 2019, the ESA had made available on its site a full spreadsheet of contact information for thousands of attendees, including email addresses, phone numbers and physical addresses. While many or most of the addresses appear to be businesses, journalists often work remotely, and the availability of a home address online can present a real safety concern. After all, many gaming journalists are routinely targets of harassments and threats of physical violence for the simple act of writing about video games on the internet. That’s the reality of the world we currently live in. And while the information leaked could have been worse, there’s a real potential human consequence here. That, in turn, presents a pretty compelling case that the ESA is going to have a pretty big headache on its hands under GDPR. Per the rules, In the case of a personal data breach, the controller shall without undue delay and, where feasible, not later than 72 hours after having become aware of it, notify the personal data breach to the supervisory authority competent in accordance with Article 55, unless the personal data breach is unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons. Where the notification to the supervisory authority is not made within 72 hours, it shall be accompanied by reasons for the delay. There is, indeed, a pretty strong argument to made that said breach could “result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons.” Failure to notify individuals in the allotted time period could, in turn, result in some hefty fines. It’s hard to say how long the ESA knew about the information, though YouTuber Sophia Narwitz, who first brought this information to light publicly, may have also been the first to alert the organization. The ESA appears to have been reasonably responsive in pulling the spreadsheet down, but the internet is always faster, and that information is still floating around online and fairy easily found. that spreadsheets like these are incredibly valuable to convention organizations, representing contact information some of the top journalists in any given industry. Many will no doubt think twice before sharing this kind of information again, of course. Notably (and, yes, ironically), the Black Hat security conference this time last year. It chalked the issue up to a “legacy system.” Natasha Lomas contributed to this report
Exclusive: Amazon moving thousands of employees out of Seattle, relocating key division to nearby city

Exclusive: Amazon moving thousands of employees out of Seattle, relocating key division to nearby city

1:05pm, 3rd April, 2019
Dave Clark, Amazon’s senior vice president of worldwide operations, shows off the company’s first branded airplane. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota) Amazon plans to relocate its entire Seattle-based worldwide operations team to Bellevue, Wash., by 2023, adding thousands of employees to its new campus just across Lake Washington, according to an internal email obtained by GeekWire. Moving a large and critical team away from Amazon’s Seattle headquarters is a significant relocation of employees on its own, but it’s also a weighty symbolic gesture — the clearest sign yet that the tech giant is cooling on its hometown while doubling down on a neighboring city. “I’m excited to share the news that we’re planning to migrate worldwide operations to Bellevue starting this year,” said Dave Clark, the senior vice president in charge of the team, in an email to his employees Wednesday. “This move gives room to grow while maintaining the campus feel that we’ve come to love around South Lake Union.” Sources familiar with the plans said several thousand employees will be moving to Bellevue in the years ahead. Amazon confirmed the authenticity of the email obtained by GeekWire. Worldwide operations is one of the most critical teams at Amazon, the arm responsible for getting packages to customers’ doors. It oversees more than around the world and the 250,000 employees who work there. The team also manages Amazon’s thousands of delivery truck trailers and its fleet of 40 airplanes. New logistics initiatives, like Amazon’s “” program, also fall under the worldwide operations purview. Amazon will start moving employees to Bellevue this month and will finish the migration by 2023. The company currently has 700 employees in Bellevue and more than 45,000 at its Seattle headquarters. It would take some time for Amazon’s Bellevue team to grow to a size that rivals Seattle, but moving the worldwide operations team is a big step in that direction. The migration adds weight to the theory that Amazon is shifting its focus to Bellevue and other cities across the country amid ongoing tensions between the tech giant and its longtime hometown. Amazon Delivery Service Partner business owner Olaoluwa Abimbola, left, with Amazon SVP Dave Clark. (GeekWire Photo) Why would Amazon move one of its most essential teams out of the company’s Seattle headquarters? Amazon hasn’t yet commented publicly, but there are a few possible reasons. The move allows Amazon to continue tapping the Seattle region’s deep talent pool but allows the company to escape some of the friction it is experiencing in its hometown. Bellevue , but CEO Jeff Bezos moved the company’s headquarters to Seattle’s urban core early on. He said the goal was to provide the type of urban environment that young, dynamic tech workers thrive in. But fast-forward to 2019 and the tech industry’s rapid growth has fomented frustration among longtime Seattleites who have whiplash from how quickly the city is changing. Supporters of the head tax rush the City Council chambers during a vote to repeal the controversial legislation. Behind the banner, Councilmember Kshama Sawant calls for order. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg) That animosity came to a head last year, when Seattle officials passed a tax on big businesses, like Amazon, to fund affordable housing, a pressing issue in the region. The business community balked at the tax, leading the city to repeal it less than a month later. The fight over the so-called “” became emblematic of Amazon’s strained relationship with Seattle. It’s a shadow that when the company announced plans to open two 25,000-person offices, concluding its second headquarters competition. Activists in New York pushed back against the plan, referencing Amazon’s battles with Seattle officials over issues like the head tax. Eventually, . The company’s plans to build an office in Northern Virginia and a 5,000-person are still underway. Related: The withdrawal from New York — coupled with news that it had planned to occupy in Seattle — raised questions about where the company will focus its growth going forward. Bellevue began to look a lot like the company’s real “HQ2.” Amazon’s plans to move the worldwide operations team lend credibility to that theory, but Bellevue will not be absorbing the 25,000 jobs the company had planned to bring to New York, sources say. The majority of Amazonians in Bellevue will be existing positions currently held by Seattle employees. Amazon says the 25,000 New York jobs will be dispersed across its offices. Plans to move the operations team to Bellevue have been in the works for a year, according to sources. That pre-dates the HQ2 drama that unfolded in New York. Expedia’s Bellevue headquarters will soon be full of Amazonians. (GeekWire Photo) Amazon still has nearly 10,000 job openings in Seattle proper and sources say that isn’t going to change. One possible motivation for moving the worldwide operations team is a desire to create more space for new hires in Seattle. The worldwide operations team will move into at least three Bellevue buildings: Summit III, a 17-story building , Expedia’s , and the 13-story Summit II building, where Amazon is . Seattle employees may also move into Amazon’s Center 425 tower in Bellevue. The thousands of employees moving to Bellevue comprise the corporate worldwide operations team currently located in Seattle. Worldwide operations employees that are dispersed across the globe will not be relocating. Clark’s team plans to ramp up hiring in Bellevue in the coming weeks, with a focus on software engineers, research scientists, and , sources say, in addition to the employees moving from Seattle to Bellevue. Amazon currently has about 450 listed in the Bellevue area. Update: An Amazon spokesperson issued the following statement about its Bellevue plans: “We opened our first office building in Bellevue in 2017. It’s a city with great amenities, a high-quality of life for our employees, and fantastic talent – and it’s recognized for its business-friendly environment. We look forward to continue growing our presence in Bellevue and bring more jobs to the city.”
Vancouver, B.C., steps in for Seattle as thousands gather for The International ‘Dota 2’ championships

Vancouver, B.C., steps in for Seattle as thousands gather for The International ‘Dota 2’ championships

5:36pm, 21st August, 2018
They come from “all corners of the Earth,” and this week, instead of settling in Seattle, competitors and rabid fans have assembled three hours north, in Vancouver, B.C., for The International, the huge “Dota 2” esports tournament. Bellevue, Wash.-based gaming giant Valve moved the tournament to Canada for the first time after holding it at Seattle’s KeyArena for four years. When the decision was made in March, of the venue at Seattle Center. Now Rogers Arena is playing host to the main event — which opened Monday and runs through Saturday — and its thousands of attendees and big tourism dollars. A video from the opening ceremony, above, was a mix of live music, acrobatics, team introductions and footage of gamers’ agony and ecstasy from previous competitions. Valve co-founder Gabe Newell then took the stage to welcome everyone. “I do want to personally thank our Canadian neighbors,” Newell said. “Putting on an event like this when you have people coming from 64 nations is really challenging.” Newell had previously said that The International because of President Donald Trump’s immigration policies, but blame was ultimately placed on the $700 million renovation of KeyArena. The prize pool for The International is almost $25 million, with more than $10 million of that going to the first place team. If you’re not in Vancouver with thousands of other “Dota 2” fans, the action is being . You can also check out the scene so far in some images from the official Instagram account: A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 12:23pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 12:47pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 12:42pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 12:13pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 3:13pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 6:16pm PDT A post shared by (@dota2ti) on Aug 20, 2018 at 8:53pm PDT